Dear America Wiki
Advertisement
Dear America Wiki

"I frowned at Ebba and explained that I want none of those things that seem to be expected of me. What I really want, I told her, is to be free of all restraints, so that I can do as I please, as long as I hurt no one. I have heard people say that kings have the power to do whatever they wish, but in fact the opposite is true: My life is governed by customs and traditions that I have no authority to change. There are so many things I cannot do, just because I am a woman!"
Kristina[2]

Kristina: The Girl King is the fifteenth fictional diary in Scholastic's The Royal Diaries. The book was written by Carolyn Meyer; her third for the series. It was published in May 2003 and was followed by Patricia Clark Smith's Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets.

Dedication[]

"For Lianna, Danielle, and Shannon"

Book description[]

"August 3, 1638
Papa Matthiae arrived last evening, accompanied by Jacob Henrik Elbfas, the court painter. I feared this meant I should have to pose for another official portrait. They dress you in wretchedly uncomfortable gowns and make you stand perfectly still for hours, holding something in your hand—a large feather, or a glove, or some symbolic object. When you think you cannot bear it for another minute, the thing is finished and you are expected to say how splendid it is!
In truth if I am not with Papa Matthiae and studying a serious subject, I prefer to be outside and on horseback, if possible. Or with a fencing sword.
"

Plot[]

Epilogue[]

Historical Note[]

Characters[]

Main article: List of Kristina: The Girl King characters

Author[]

Main article: Carolyn Meyer

Carolyn Meyer is an American children's and young adult author best known for her historical fiction series, Young Royals. Kristina: The Girl King is Meyer's third book in The Royal Diaries. She is also the author of Isabel: Jewel of Castilla and Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess. While researching, Meyer watched the 1933 film Queen Christina which she found entertaining but "completely different" from the life of the real Kristina. For her book, she admitted to shifting some of the events for the "sake of the story," such as Kristina's mother actually fleeing Sweden in 1640.

Notes[]

  • The portrait of Kristina on the cover was illustrated by the American artist, Tim O'Brien.

References[]

See also[]



External links[]

Advertisement